Not For the Faint of Heart

March 10th, 2011 | Meera

While preparing three fall birds, prosperous with pre-migratory feasting, something occurs to me that I’ve wondered about before, so I ask Mary about it.

“Mary, do the bugs* like fat?”

“Mmm, not really. If they’re eating well, they’ll go through anything; they’ll eat through cartilage, tendons, you know. But if they’re being fussy you’ll just come in and find big gobs of fat they’ve left behind.”

There is a pause while I consider the word “fussy” in relation to flesh-eating beetles.

“They’re spoiled,” I decide.

“Yeah. They are.”

Later, we have a conversation about whether it is theoretically possible for fat to be deposited between the two layers of fused bone that make up an adult bird’s skull. Mary says she’s seen what looks like exactly that in the course of cleaning out skeletons from the bug room, but she isn’t sure it’s a documented phenomenon.

It isn’t too long after both these chats that I take a break to enjoy the ham and cheese sandwich I’ve brought for lunch.

294

*Beetles aren’t true bugs, but everyone in Birds and Mammals calls the dermestids “the bugs,” and the room they live in is the bug room. I am not sure if the Entomology Division objects to this.

Comments are closed.